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Brexit White Paper: setting the first stones of the UK trade position

On 12 July, the UK government published its long-awaited White Paper on "The future relationship between the United Kingdom and the European Union". One major focus was the UK's future trade arrangements, both with the EU and worldwide. Below, we set out some thoughts on these proposals, their effect on the UK trade and likely responses from the EU.

Brexit White Paper: a digital Brexit?

The UK Government's White Paper sets out detailed proposals for the UK's relationship with the EU following Brexit.

As described in our dissection of the document as a whole, the White Paper sees the digital economy as an area of global opportunity for the UK.   So what does the Government have to say about sector?

Brexit White Paper: positive for life sciences

The White Paper appears largely positive for the life sciences industry, incorporating many of the key asks from the industry across its priority areas of regulation, trade, people and innovation. On regulation, the proposed "common rulebook" for goods would mean continued regulatory alignment between the EU and UK for medicines and medical devices. 

Brexit White Paper: data without borders

The UK Government is realistically ambitious in terms of achieving two objectives: (a) the continued exchange of personal data between the UK and the EU, and (b) the ICO’s participation in the One Stop Shop mechanism of regulatory oversight.

Brexit White Paper: questions remain for the Real Estate sector

The White Paper leaves many of the real estate sector's questions unanswered. Whilst it will be some comfort to developers that there will be free movement of goods, hopefully limiting the impact of Brexit on the availability and cost of materials, lack of clarity on immigration rules remains a concern. The building industry employs many EU citizens, and a Government review has already acknowledged that a shortage of bricklayers is a potential barrier to achieving the Government's targets on housebuilding. This situation is only likely to be exacerbated by ending the free movement of people. 

Brexit White Paper: energy market remains largely in the dark

The UK Government published its White Paper on The Future Relationship between the UK and the EU on 12 July 2018. In that White Paper, the UK Government reaffirmed its commitment to broad cooperation on energy post Brexit, but there continues to be real uncertainty as to the form that this cooperation will take.

A definitive UK vision for Brexit?

With 9 months to go before Britain leaves the EU, the UK Government yesterday published its most detailed proposals to date for the future relationship between the UK and EU.

Brexit crash landing – key issues for the energy sector

Given what is happening at a macro political level, a Brexit crash landing looks increasingly possible. It's the worst case scenario for the UK's energy markets.

UK electricity and gas trade with the EU27 is worth approximately EUR 6 billion annually. 80% of that trade is natural gas. The UK imports gas from the EU27 but the UK is significantly more reliant on imports of gas from Norway and LNG historically from Qatar.

Brexit: can the energy sector learn from financial services?

It seems axiomatic that immediately prior to the UK’s exit from the EU on 29 March 2019, the UK's domestic laws (in England and Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland) will be aligned with EU law.

Assuming a crash-landing "no deal" scenario can be avoided, any future trading arrangement between the UK and the EU27, will need to provide a framework through which agreed levels of market access can be maintained and post Brexit divergences between UK and EU law and regulation can be managed.

Chequers beyond the politics – 10 practical questions for business

The complex politics of Brexit are already swirling around the communique issued by the UK Government following the cabinet awayday. The full extent of the UK political fallout will only become clear in the coming hours, weeks and months as will the response from EU leaders. Whether it represents "British pragmatism at its best" or "the worst of all worlds", Chequers is only a potential "base camp" for the UK's efforts - with the clock ticking on the time available to reach the summit

Updated EMA guidance on centrally authorised medicines raises new considerations for Brexit preparations

On 19 June 2018, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) published updates to its Brexit Q&A document for human and veterinary medicines authorised via the centralised procedure and to its practical procedural guidance on making Brexit related changes to the authorisations for those products.

Commission’s notice on Brexit and copyright: Is it as bad as it sounds?

The Commission Notice says that all EU “primary and secondary law will cease to apply to the United Kingdom from 30 March 2019”. It goes on to point out that, although the UK is a party to many of the main international copyright treaties, including the WCT, WPPT and TRIPS, these treaties do not provide the same level of protection as EU copyright laws nor do they provide any particular cross-border measures for the benefit of rights-holders or users within the EU internal market.